Arizona State Law Journal Blog

Arizona State Law Journal is suspending blog posts indefinitely to allow its members to focus on their health, family, friends, and other academic responsibilities during the COVID-19 pandemic. Updates will be provided when we have them. Thank you for reading and sharing our members’ posts this year. We look forward to sharing legal thoughts, opinions, and analysis with you again soon. In the meantime, please be safe.

If you would like to submit a blog post to ASLJ during our hiatus, please email arizonastatelawjournal@gmail.com.

Guilty by Affiliation?

By Brianna Pachuilo. Introduction The Arizona Supreme Court recently decided in State v. Arevalo that an Arizona statute that increases criminal penalties based upon gang affiliation is unconstitutional. While many states have statutes that heighten charges for crimes committed to support gang activity, the Arizona

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Are All Threats Created Equal?

“Original Golfos” by El Chico Iwana is licensed under CC BY-NC-ND 2.0 By Kole Lyons. Gangs have been documented in Arizona as early as the 1930s. Since then, gangs have increased in number and become involved in more criminal activities around the state. As violent

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Is There a Valid Claim for “Fake News”?

By Madelaine Bauer. Background In the wake of an upcoming election, the Trump campaign has taken action and filed libel lawsuits against both the New York Times and the Washington Post. In February 2020, the Trump campaign began their suits by filing against the New

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Is There a Federal Right to Genetic Privacy?

By Victoria Romine. What is Genetic Genealogy? Ever since the 2018 capture of Joseph DeAngelo, California’s infamous Golden State Killer, genetic genealogy has been used to solve hundreds of unsolved crimes. Law enforcement uses genetic genealogy by submitting DNA from an unsolved crime to a

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Kobe Bryant’s Death: An Avoidable Tragedy

By John Oliver. Background Kobe Bryant’s death not only shocked the sports world but also the nation. Kobe was a professional basketball player who entered the National Basketball Association (“NBA”) straight out of high school in 1996. Kobe enjoyed enormous success throughout his twenty-year career,

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Infringement Suits: The Latest Trend in Fast Fashion?

By Samantha Orwoll. Fast Fashion Industry Fast fashion brands, such as Forever 21, ZARA, and ASOS, create a nearly constant stream of clothes. The brands promise the latest trends at affordable prices. Rather than create seasonal collections, they produce new offerings weekly and have thousands

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Stare Decisis: A Matter of Life and Death?

By Alanna Ostby. Background On October 16, 2019, the Supreme Court heard oral arguments for Mathena v. Malvo—a case rising out of a string of sniper-style shootings in 2002 that killed twelve individuals and injured six others in the D.C. metropolitan area. One of the

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Is Amendment No. 28 on the Horizon?

By Allie Karpurk. What is the Equal Rights Amendment? On January 27, 2020, Virginia became the thirty-eighth state to ratify the Equal Rights Amendment (“ERA” or “Amendment”). The ERA was written by the National Women’s Party in 1923 following the Party’s successful fight for women’s

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Arizona Answering Tough Questions Regarding Medicaid Work Requirements

By Sara Kizer. Ten states received approval from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) to impose Medicaid work requirements on beneficiaries to incentivize work and community engagement among non-disabled, non-elderly adult Medicaid beneficiaries. Through these requirements, states established minimum hours of working or

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Supreme Court to Decide Landmark Trademark Case in 2020

By Marissa Gibbens.In its 2020 cycle, the Supreme Court will review the 4th Circuit Court of Appeals’ decision in United States Patent and Trademark Office v. Booking.com B.V. The Court will decide whether the addition of the term “.com” can turn a generic term (such

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Attempted Murder is Violent, Murder is Not

By Alexandra Klein.In August of 2019, the Ninth Circuit held in United States v. Begay that second-degree murder was not a “crime of violence.” You read that right. Second-degree murder is categorically not a crime of violence. The Facts In 2013, Randly Begay was arguing

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Unconstitutionally Listed for Life?

By Sierra Brown. Case Study: Phillip B. v. McKay In 2018, Phillip B. worked as a caregiver at New Horizons, a group home for male children. On July 6, 2018, a fifteen-year-old resident of the home called the Arizona Department of Child Safety (“DCS”), alleging

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A Novel Solution to the Multiple Causation Problem

By Sterling Johnson. What is the proper method of allocating liability where A and B owe contract duties to C under separate contracts, and each breaches independently, and it is not reasonably possible to make a division of the damage caused by the separate breaches?

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The Supreme Court Begins to Hear the DACA Case

By Ava Esler. Background Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (“DACA”) was implemented by President Obama as a means to provide work authorization and prevent the removal of young undocumented immigrants brought to the United States as children. Since DACA was enacted by executive order in

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EA Sports, It’s (back?) in the Game

By Tyson Woodford. Background For me, O’Bannon v. NCAA (previously mentioned on this blog here and here) was a landmark case that impacted my daily life. Sure, it dealt with the NCAA profiting from the image and likeness of its uncompensated student athletes, but to

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Do plaintiffs in data breach cases have a leg to stand on?

By Kacie Donovan. Data breaches and resulting amounts of compromised personal information are increasing rapidly. The FBI has said “[T]here are only two types of companies: those that have been hacked and those that will be. And even they are converging into one category: companies

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Supreme Court Kicks Off Controversial Docket

By Harman Dhanoa. On October 7th, 2019, the justices returned to the bench for what has been called “the most significant Supreme Court term in a decade.” The docket of 59 cases is set to cover high-profile matters including abortion, gun rights, LGBT+ rights, presidential

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Compensation of College Athletes: A Reward for Athletic Achievement or Bribe?

By Madelaine Bauer. For many years, there has been a crucial debate circulating the college athletics world—whether college athletes should be compensated, specifically, for their name, image or likeness. Circling back to 2009, the National Collegiate Athletic Association (“NCAA”) faced their first uproar of the controversy on college athlete compensation with

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Ninth Circuit Stays Federal Execution of Navajo Man

By Mike Brown. In October 2001, Lezmond Mitchell confessed to the murder of sixty-three-year-old Alyce Slim and her nine-year-old granddaughter. A jury convicted Mitchell and sentenced him to die for his crimes. Now, eighteen years after the killings, the Ninth Circuit has stayed Mitchell’s execution.

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PURPA’s Uncertain Future in Arizona’s Solar Energy Portfolio

By Cory Bernard. Post-hearing briefs filed last week in a matter before the Arizona Corporation Commission (ACC), plus a recent Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) Notice of Proposed Rulemaking, highlight fierce debates over a key weapon in solar developers’ arsenal. The Public Utility Regulatory Policies

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The opinions expressed herein are those of the individual contributors to the ASLJ Blog and should not be construed as the opinions of the
Arizona State Law Journal or the Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law at Arizona State University.