State Constitution Perpetuities Provisions: Derivation, Meaning, and Application

Home / Print / 2016 / State Constitution Perpetuities Provisions: Derivation, Meaning, and Application

Les Raatz

The Rule Against Perpetuities, over the last decade or so, has attracted greater attention within areas of the estate planning bar. There are interrelated factors that are the primary reasons for this attention. One is the marketing of trusts that are designed to better protect against the ability of creditors of the beneficiaries of a trust to reach assets of the trust to satisfy their claims. Lengthening the period that such assets may remain unvested in beneficiaries in the trusts is touted as enhancing their value and usefulness. The longer period to defer vesting also has beneficial estate tax consequences. If trust property can be held for generations in a trust not subject to the common-law rule requiring the vesting of interests of the trust in the beneficiaries of the trust within a period ending twenty-one years after the death of the last to survive of those living when the trust became irrevocable, then inclusion of trust assets in the gross estates of beneficiaries for federal estate tax purposes is avoided to a greater extent.

Full Article