Voter Confusion: Mi Familia Vota v. Hobbs

Arizona State Law Journal Blog
By Katie Giel.On October 5, 2020, U.S. District Judge Logan ordered that the voter-registration deadline be extended 18 days to October 23. The ruling was immediately appealed to the Ninth Circuit, where it was stayed on October 13, ending the voter-registration period on October 15. Arizonans will probably recall this highly confusing period where articles continued circulating on social media about the lower court’s extension, even though the Ninth Circuit had already closed registration. The Ninth Circuit’s reasoning in this decision may illuminate how future cases about burdens on the right to vote will be evaluated. The Argument Plaintiffs Mi Familia Vota and the Arizona Coalition for Change argued that the circumstances of 2020 make it so the original voter-registration deadline of October 5th would be burdensome to the exercise…
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Preventing Hate Crimes

Arizona State Law Journal Blog
By Shayna Frieden.Beginning around 5 p.m. on Tuesday, March 16, a shooter killed eight people at three different spas in and around Atlanta, Georgia. Six of the victims were Asian women. Although authorities have not yet confirmed a motive, these fatal shootings come amidst a year of increasing anti-Asian discrimination and violence. Nearly 3,800 hate incidents have been reported since March of 2020, and more than double of the attacks were against women. Forty-three incidents of anti-Asian discrimination have also been reported in Arizona since March of 2020.The existence of hate crimes is unfortunately not new in our society. In Arizona in 2019, crimes motivated by race and ethnicity accounted for nearly 66% of the reported incidents (143 out of 217), which was the highest percentage of the decade. Advocates…
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The 9/12 Split: The Newest Proposal To Reduce the Burden on Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals.

Arizona State Law Journal Blog
By Kole Lyons.In January 2021, a coalition of Idaho legislators introduced H.R. 320, The Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals Judgeship and Reorganization Act of 2021. This proposal would leave the Ninth Circuit covering California, Guam, Hawaii, and the Northern Mariana Islands. Meanwhile, the proposed Twelfth Circuit would cover Alaska, Arizona, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, Oregon, and Washington. The Twelfth Circuit would hold its regular sessions in Seattle, Washington, and Phoenix, Arizona. Idaho proposes this bill to reduce the Ninth Circuit’s burden, which is currently the largest and most backlogged Federal Circuit Court of Appeals.Ninth Circuit StatisticsThe Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals was established 130 years ago in 1891. At that time, the two judges on the court had jurisdiction over California, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, Oregon, and Washington. Those regions’ population was…
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Proof of Vaccination and Vaccine Passports— Reasonable Requirement or Invasion of Privacy?

Arizona State Law Journal Blog
By Stephanie Deskins.  Call for COVID-19 Vaccine Passports As the pandemic rages on, lawmakers across the country are desperate to reopen their communities and their economies. New York State introduced the digital “Excelsior Pass” in March, allowing individuals to regain access to popular venues after proving they received a COVID-19 vaccine. Other states like Hawaii that have been hard hit by reduced tourism are similarly developing app-based vaccine passports.  The Biden administration caused national uproar after announcing plans to create a national vaccine passport.  Florida Governor Ron DeSantis stated he would use an “executive function” to block any vaccine passport system in his state.  Two Ohio state legislators opposed to vaccine passports plan to introduce legislation that preempts vaccine passports in Ohio. In light of these and other concerns, the…
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Resurgence of Executions at the State and Federal Level

Arizona State Law Journal Blog
By Brianna Pachuilo. After seventeen years without a single federal execution, the federal government resumed executing death-row inmates last summer in the midst of a global pandemic. This timing was curious with declining national approval of the death penalty and a nationwide battle to keep people healthy and alive at the height of a global health crisis. Arizona has recently followed suit, with the Arizona Department of Corrections (ADC) announcing it is also prepared to resume executions. The execution uptake intertwines a number of legal, political, and humanitarian concerns at the federal and state level. Federal Level Starting in July 2020, the federal government began carrying out executions at an alarming rate. Over the past year, there has been an unprecedented thirteen executions in the past six months, which is…
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How To Get Away With Murder (If You’re Ultra-Wealthy)

Arizona State Law Journal Blog
By Gideon Cionelo. “No one is above the law.” Presidents, protestors, and prosecutors often repeat this talking point because it emphasizes fairness and equal justice—integral parts of any legal system. But is it true? Well, not always. If you’re ultra-wealthy, you can purchase access and protection that virtually places you “above the law.” How does this happen? Let’s walk through each step. Step One: Become Ultra-Wealthy Most people aren’t born with tens of millions of dollars to their name, so becoming ultra-wealthy is the first task. Perhaps you can reach this point after a lifetime of good luck, genius, and hard work—but that’s difficult. Corruption is much easier. While corruption takes many forms, the most common path is to leverage personal and professional connections within a poor country that has…
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Now Showing: Hollywood’s Legal Struggles Amid COVID-19

Arizona State Law Journal Blog
By Hanna Reinke. Introduction COVID-19 has upended seemingly every aspect of life as we previously knew it. With all fifty states issuing independent emergency declarations and the federal government invoking emergency measures of its own, a large portion of life outside of the home was sidelined or significantly altered for months on end. With the added time that many have been spending in their homes, there’s been a noticeable, and unsurprising, uptick in individuals who subscribe to various streaming services (e.g., Netflix, Hulu, YouTube TV). However, in light of the litany of COVID-19 social distancing measures imposed nationwide, content creation in the entertainment industry has taken a hit. As movies and regular television show releases became more sparse, consumers were left wondering what was truly happening to their beloved entertainment…
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Capital Punishment: We Should Aim For Progress Where We Can Get It

Arizona State Law Journal Blog
By Eric Wilkins. Arizona officials recently announced that they have acquired a supply of pentobarbital, a difficult-to-obtain lethal injection drug. Plans to resume executions will end the current period of nearly seven years without state-administered capital punishment. The ending of this long hiatus has, once again, brought to the public attention unsettled questions of ethics, legality, and policy surrounding the controversial practice. Modern Capital Punishment in Arizona and the U.S. One thing is undisputed: Arizona’s reputation with capital punishment is tarnished at best. In July 2014, Arizona received national attention as death row inmate Joseph Wood somehow received a chemical dose that was fifteen times greater than the designated lethal dose—and then died slowly as he gasped and choked for air for almost two hours. Under normal circumstances, the execution…
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A Real Life “Ghost” Story: The Rise and Regulation of Home-Assembled Firearms

Arizona State Law Journal Blog
By Andrew KudlinskiOn March 22, a gunman opened fire at a grocery store in Boulder, Colorado, killing ten people. The shooting occurred soon after another gunman killed eight people at three different spas in Atlanta, Georgia. The horrifying attacks have reignited a long-unresolved debate on the nature of gun control in the United States. In response to the shootings, President Biden urged Congress to swiftly pass new gun control legislation. The House of Representatives has sent two bills to the Senate that would broaden background checks on gun purchases.However, gun control activists have demanded more, calling on President Biden to utilize executive orders for an immediate response. A specific demand has emerged from a coalition of state attorneys general: close the loophole on “ghost” guns.What is a “ghost” gun?Ghost guns…
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Goodbye Rule 5.4: Legal Ethics Change in Arizona

Arizona State Law Journal Blog
By Joel TruettAt the beginning of this year Arizona Ethics Rule 5.4 formally ended. The Arizona Supreme Court announced the elimination of the rule last year, and has since gone into effect on January 1, 2021. The rule prohibited partnerships between lawyers and non-lawyers working together where any part of their services involved the practice of law.In the United States, model ethics rules for lawyers are proposed by the American Bar Association, but the laws governing lawyers are enacted on a state-by-state basis. This means that the rules about how lawyers can behave change from one state to the next. The provisions enacted in Rule 5.4, however, were uniformly accepted in every state until this year. This makes Arizona the first state to cast off its restrictions on attorney/non-attorney partnerships.The…
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